2017 Tree Selection

Dawn Redwood 1

Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn Redwood)

This is an impressive tree by any standard. Of special note is that fossils in northern parts of the United States show that the dawn redwood existed up to 50,000,000 years ago during the time of the dinosaurs! It was long thought to be extinct—until it was discovered alive and well in a rural, mountainous area of China. The dawn redwood is relatively carefree and fast growing, with one specimen in Virginia having reached 120 feet in 30 years! As the tree matures, the trunk broadens at the base and develops attractive and sometimes elaborate fluting. Foliage emerges light green in spring, matures to deep green in summer and turns a rich red-bronze in fall.

Mature Height: 70’
Mature Spread: 30'
Under Wires?: No

Austrian Pine 1

Pinus nigra (Austrian Pine)

It has been called the toughest of all European pines and, we would add, the hardest working. Well-known horticulturalist, Dr. Carl Whitcomb, said the tree "rivals all pines in durability under adverse conditions." They have a high tolerance to pollution, smog, poor soils, harsh winters, windy conditions, and drought. This pine has been put to work as both a beautiful landscape tree—with its dense, dark green crown—and a working tree that restores strip mines and scarred land, stabilizes soil and tames the wind.

Mature Height: 60’
Mature Spread: 40'
Under Wires?: No


Serbian Spruce 1

Picea omorika (Serbian Spruce)

Noted horticulturist Michael Dirr referred to the Serbian Spruce as “one of the most graceful and beautiful spruces.” Once you see its thin, arching branches and slender, straight trunk, you will understand why, but this tree is much more than a pretty face, with notably sturdy branches and high tolerance of most urban conditions. Its beauty and adaptability makes it ideal for home landscapes, screening, buffer strips, and median strips.

Mature Height: 60’
Mature Spread: 25'
Under Wires: No

Tulip Tree 1

Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip Tree)

One can argue about whether the "tulips" are the outline of its leaves or its cup-shaped flowers, but both undoubtedly contributed to the fanciful name given to this tree by early settlers. The tulip tree is still beloved for its beauty today, serving as the state tree of Kentucky, Indiana and Tennessee. It is the tallest of the eastern hardwoods—and a rapid grower when conditions are right. If you’re looking for a stunning tree that grows quickly and doesn’t suffer from many pest problems, your search is over. While most trees will be turning brown in the fall, the tulip tree turns from green to bright vibrant yellow.

Mature Height: 30’
Mature Spread: 30'
Under Wires?: No

Autumn Gold Ginkgo 2

Ginko biloba ‘Autumn Gold’ (Autumn Gold Ginkgo)

Ginkgo biloba is one of the most beautiful deciduous trees, and 'Autumn Gold' is a superior selection of this species. It is tough enough to live in the harshest environments, even as street trees in crowded cities. Brilliant fall color is one of the many positive attributes of this tree. Leaves turn a uniform golden yellow in autumn (spectacular when backlit by early morning or late afternoon sun) and persist for several weeks. When the leaves do drop, they drop rapidly, forming a golden carpet around the tree. The shape of a ginkgo leaf, with its scalloped outer margin, is like those of maidenhair ferns, hence the common name of maidenhair tree.

Mature Height: 45’
Mature Spread: 35'
Under Wires?: No

Tupelo 2

Nyssa sylvatica (Tupelo)

Called “one of the best and most consistent native trees for fall color” by tree expert Michael Dirr. Displaying various hues of yellow, orange, bright red and purple—often on the same branch—its foliage is a stand-out of the autumn season. Even the distinctive bark, which resembles alligator hide, adds visual and textural interest. While its blooms are not showy, bees will be very appreciative of the presence of this tree, as it serves as an important late-spring food source. Grows well in the urban environment, as well as moist or boggy areas.

Mature Height: 40’
Mature Spread: 20'
Under Wires?: No

Wadas Memory Magnolia 2

Magnolia kobus ‘Wada's Memory’ (Wada's Memory Magnolia)

A cross between M. kobus and M. salicifolia. This widely popular magnolia has white flowers 7 inches in diameter. The large scented flowers cover the trees in a white cloud as soon as the weather warms in spring. Even the gentlest breeze makes them flutter like a cloud of large white butterflies. When the flowering finishes after a couple of weeks, the opening of the large mahogany-red leaves offers another grand spectacle. During the summer, when the leaves have greened, the tree is also attractive and in autumn the foliage turns a brilliant yellow. The fast growing 'Wada's Memory' has a strongly pyramidal form into maturity making it stand out against more rounded trees in the landscape.

Mature Height: 30’
Mature Spread: 20'
Under Wires?: Yes

Kousa Dogwood 2

Cornus kousa ‘Chinensis’ (Kousa Dogwood)

Dogwood trees are widely known for their delicate beauty, and the kousa variety adds a toughness that makes this species an excellent choice for home landscapes and urban areas. The tree makes a visual contribution year-round. In spring, it produces a heavenly array of star-like blooms. In summer, its intriguing canopy of layered branches provides shade and beauty. In autumn, it offers spectacular bright red color. Even in winter, this tree has an appeal all its own with bark that resembles a jigsaw puzzle. The spring blooms are probably the tree’s largest selling point—and its most misunderstood. The white “petals” are not actually petals at all. They are modified leaves called bracts that surround the small greenish-yellow flowers.

Mature Height: 20’
Mature Spread: 20'
Under Wires?: Yes

Frost Peach 1

Frost Peach

Frost Peach is smothered in stunning clusters of fragrant hot pink flowers along the branches in early spring, which emerge from distinctive dark red flower buds before the leaves. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The narrow leaves turn yellow in fall. The fruits are showy chartreuse fruits with a scarlet blush, which are carried in abundance in mid-summer. This heavy-bearing, freestone variety ripens in August, and its flesh is good for fresh eating or canning.

Mature Height: 20’
Mature Spread: 20'
Under Wires: Yes